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Fish Tagine with Chermoula

Fish tagine with Chermoula
Image | Mat Arney © Copyright | Philleigh Way Cookery School

Recipe by

Philleigh Way Cookery School

Philleigh Way is a cookery school based in south Cornwall that also offers unique dining experiences. Our Farmhouse Cookery style is inspired by recipes handed down over the generations, fantastic local produce and experience gained working in some of the top kitchens in Cornwall and around the globe.

Chef

Rupert Cooper

Website

www.philleighway.co.uk

Ingredients

For the tagine:
150g firm white fish, whatever is sustainable and in season, such as hake, monkfish, pollack, brill, or haddock
A handful of mussels
2 onions, thinly sliced
3cm piece of root ginger, finely chopped
Saffron (a pinch)
Skin of half a preserved lemon, rinsed and chopped
1tbsp tomato purée
350ml vegetable stock
250g small new potatoes, cut into wedges
Handful of cherry tomatoes
 
For the chermoula:
1 large bunch coriander – save a few leaves for a garnish
2tsp hot smoked paprika
1tsp ground cumin
1tsp ground coriander
Juice of 2 lemons
2 garlic cloves, crushed
Olive oil
Red wine vinegar

Method

In a large pan, heat 1 tbsp of oil with the onions and ginger.  Season and fry for ten minutes until soft.
Add the saffron and continue to fry for another minute, then add the chopped preserved lemon, tomato purée, stock and new potatoes.  Bring to the boil and then turn down the heat and simmer for ten minutes.
Add the fish, mussels, and tomatoes to the tagine.  Cook for five minutes, or until the fish is cooked through.
To make the chermoula put all of the dry ingredients into a food processor with a glug of olive oil and a dash of red wine vinegar.  Blitz, adding lemon juice until it reaches a loose sauce consistency.
Serve the tagine in bowls and drizzle generously with chermoula.

 

Brill

Gill Netting

Cornish vessels landing to Cornish ports

Gill nets are lightweight nets made of nylon (monofilament) fishing line that are anchored to the seabed and are used to catch fish by entangling the gills.

Beam Trawling

Cornish vessels landing to Cornish ports

Beam trawls are nets attached to a steel beam that holds the net open. The belly of the net is made of chains and the upper surface of the net is mesh. Beam trawlers pull two nets along the seabed simultaneously.

Demersal Trawl

Cornish vessels landing to Cornish ports

Demersal trawls are large nets that are pulled through the water with the bottom edge of the net touching the seabed. At each edge the net is pulled open by metal ‘trawl doors’. Sometimes referred to as Otter trawling.

Haddock

Demersal Trawl

Cornish waters VIIe, f, g and h

Demersal trawls are large nets that are pulled through the water with the bottom edge of the net touching the seabed. At each edge the net is pulled open by metal ‘trawl doors’. Sometimes referred to as Otter trawling.

Beam Trawling

Cornish waters VIIe, f, g and h

Beam trawls are nets with a steel beam that holds the net open. The belly of the net is made of chains and the upper surface of the net is mesh. Beam trawlers pull two nets along the seabed simultaneously.

Gill Netting

Cornish waters VIIe, f, g and h

Gill nets are lightweight nets made of nylon (monofilament) fishing line that are anchored to the seabed and are used to catch fish by entangling the gills.

Monkfish, black bellied

Beam Trawling

Cornwall VII e,f,g and h

Caught using heavy beam trawl nets that are dragged over the seabed.

Gill Netting

Cornwall VIIe f g and h

Large mesh 'tangle nets' are set on the seabed to target monkfish, turbot, spider crabs and crawfish.

Demersal Trawl

Cornwall VII e,f,g and h

A large trawl held open by paravane trawl doors, the open net is then pulled along in contact with the seabed

Pollack

Gill Netting

Cornish waters VIIe, f, g and h

Gill nets are lightweight nets made of nylon (monofilament) fishing line that are anchored to the seabed and are used to catch fish by entangling the gills.

Handlining

Cornish vessels landing to Cornish ports

Handlining is a simple fishing method where hooks on lines are used to catch fish in a very traditional and sustainable way.

Demersal Trawl

Cornish waters VIIe, f, g and h

Demersal trawls are large nets that are pulled through the water with the bottom edge of the net touching the seabed.

Monkfish, white

Gill Netting

Cornwall areas VIIe- h

Caught using monofilament tangle nets set on the seabed.

Beam Trawling

Cornwall areas VIIe- h

Caught using heavy beam trawl nets that are dragged over the seabed.

Demersal Trawl

Cornwall areas VIIe- h

A large trawl held open by paravane trawl doors, the open net is then pulled along in contact with the seabed.

Hake

Demersal Trawl

Cornish vessels landing to Cornish ports

Demersal trawls are large nets that are pulled through the water with the bottom edge of the net touching the seabed. At each edge the net is pulled open by metal ‘trawl doors’. Sometimes referred to as Otter trawling.

Gill Netting

Cornish Waters

MSC certified fishery. Gill nets are lightweight nets made of nylon (monofilament) fishing line that are anchored to the seabed and are used to catch fish by entangling the gills.

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Cornwall Good Seafood Guide is underpinned by the Marine Conservation Society (MCS) Good Fish Guide. The first UK consumer guide to sustainable seafood. For more information visit www.fishonline.org

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